MJIL Blog

Established in 2015, the MJIL Blog presents writing from MJIL’s Associate Editors, who come to the journal with varied and diverse interests in and experience with International Law. The Blog provides students with a robust platform to express their views on relevant and contemporary topics, with each new associate publishing at least one piece of high-quality short-form scholarship per volume. The views and opinions expressed in these articles are those of the authors only.


 

Aug 2019

Naz Khan
Guest Editor
ICC Jurisdiction

In Resolution 1564,[1] the U.N. Security Council (UNSC) requested the U.N. Secretary-General investigate reports of gross violations of humanitarian and human rights laws in the Darfur region of Sudan between 2003 and 2008.[2] The International Commission established that the Sudanese government, along with Rapid Support Forces (RSF)

Apr 2019

Matthew Thornburg
Vol. 40 Associate Editor
There is a problem on the moon, which concerns humanity’s very identity.  These high stakes will force us to answer an important question: which parts of humanity do we wish to eternalize? I’m talking about the problem of preserving mankind’s history on the moon. Right now,

James Schwab
Vol. 40 Associate Editor
Electronic commerce (e-commerce) is changing the global economy, creating new opportunities and challenges.  However, many of the rules governing the global economy, including the agreements of the World Trade Organization (WTO), were drafted decades before digital trade was an important part of global trade.

Many members of

Mar 2019

Joshua Raftis
Vol. 40 Associate Editor
In January of this year, Juan Guaido, the President of Venezuela’s opposition-dominated National Assembly, unilaterally declared himself president of Venezuela in defiance of the sitting president, Nicolas Maduro.[1] Guaido based his claim to the presidency on Articles 233, 333, and 350 of the Venezuelan Constitution, which

Dec 2018

Nov 2018

Melissa Danzo
Vol. 40 Associate Editor
Since the Paris Climate Agreement was signed in 2015, power shifts among the most prominent state signatories have left spectators questioning the future of the Agreement.[1] In the midst of these political shake-ups, international attention has turned to non-state actors (NSAs)—a term used herein to mean

Tyler J. Owen
Vol. 40 Executive Editor
“Many people say data is the new oil—the oil of the twenty-first century. . . .
If data is the new oil, then data protection is the new pollution control.”[1]

We live in a data-centric world. From our Cyber Monday purchases to the political pages we follow

Camille Valdes Reyes
Vol. 40 Associate Editor
Since the 1980s, the European Court of Human Rights (“ECtHR” or “the Court”) has interpreted the European Convention of Human Rights (“ECHR” or “the Convention”) expansively so as to include LGBT rights.[1]  The Court has gone as far as reading discrimination on the grounds of

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