Paris Attacks: An “Act of War”? Terrorism’s Place in International Law

Katrien Wilmots, Vol. 37 Associate Editor On Friday November 13, 2015 three teams of coordinated attackers carried out terrorist assaults in Paris. There were three suicide bombings outside the Stade de France, mass shootings, and additional suicide bombings at four other locations. The deadliest attack was at the Bataclan theater where attackers shot and took […]

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Offensive Autonomous Weapons: Should We Be Worried?

Christian Husby, Vol. 37 Associate Editor Offensive autonomous weapons. Stephen Hawking, Elon Musk, and Noam Chomsky are opposed,[1] Human Rights Watch is opposed,[2] and 68% of Americans are opposed.[3] So, should we be worried?

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Do the Geneva Conventions Need an Adjudicative Body?

William Quinn, Vol. 37 Associate Editor The Geneva Conventions of 1949 are universally recognized as the core body of international law regulating the conduct of armed conflict.[1] Nevertheless, it seems trite to remark that they have not been universally obeyed.[2] That lack of obedience has not gone unnoticed, as political leaders, lawyers, activists, and journalists […]

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