China should honor its treaty obligations to Hong Kong

Han Zhu Vol. 39 Executive Editor On June 30, 2017, the spokesman of the Chinese Foreign Ministry, in a retort to foreign statements regarding the political conditions of Hong Kong, said the Sino-British Joint Declaration, which laid the groundwork for Hong Kong’s handover, is a “historical document that no longer has any realistic meaning.”[i] Not […]

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How Should We Criticize Aung San Suu Kyi’s Handling of the Rohingya Crisis?

Jens Thomsen Vol. 39 Associate Editor The Rohingya, a stateless, predominantly Muslim ethnic group, are victims of persecution being carried out in the western border state of Rakhine by Myanmar’s military forces.[1] It is the fastest-growing ongoing refugee crisis—since late August of this year, 615,500 refugees have fled to Bangladesh to escape execution, rape, and […]

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The State of a Stateless People: The Current Rohingya Crisis

Jessica Riley Vol. 39 Associate Editor They have been called “the world’s most persecuted people.”[1] They have been denied citizenship and basic human rights in the only country many have ever known.[2] They have been beaten, raped, and murdered.[3]  For many of the Rohingya people, this laundry list of abuses has recently reached an alarming […]

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Burundi’s Challenge to the ICC’s “Africa Bias”

Burundi’s Challenge to the ICC’s “Africa Bias”

Layan Charara Vol. 39 Associate Editor On October 27, 2017, Burundi became the first country to withdraw from the International Criminal Court (ICC).[1] Its withdrawal is presumed to be an attempt to elude scrutiny of the carnage ensuing since President Pierre Nkurunziza made a third bid for the presidency in 2015.[2] The Nkurunziza administration is […]

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Due Diligence and the Gray Zones of International Cyberspace Laws

Due Diligence and the Gray Zones of International Cyberspace Laws

Olivia Hankinson Vol. 39 Associate Editor With ever-changing and developing technology, a growing concern in the field of international law stems from cyberspace security.[1] In an effort to combat and alleviate this growing concern, a group of international law experts joined together to produce the Tallinn Manuals.[2] The Tallinn Manual 2.0 is the most updated […]

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Insecurity Assurances: Asserting Human Rights to Remedy Breaches of Security Assurances

Insecurity Assurances: Asserting Human Rights to Remedy Breaches of Security Assurances

Kaley Hanenkrat Vol. 39 Associate Editor In 1994, Ukraine’s then-President Kuchma[1] surrendered the remaining portion of the Soviet nuclear arsenal on Ukraine’s territory for security assurances from the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Russian Federation.[2] The language of the agreement reflects a delicate power balance at the end of the Cold War[3] and, […]

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Aggression, from Cyber-Attacks to ISIS: Why International Law Struggles to Adapt

Albi Kocibelli Vol. 39 Editor In Chief Ius ad bellum and the notion of aggression have been a ‘yin yang’ for centuries.[1] Nevertheless, international law did not prohibit states from engaging in aggression until the conclusion of the Kellogg-Briand Pact.[2] Even then, the term was not defined.  In the aftermath of World War II, the […]

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From Compulsion to Cooperation: The Importance of the Local in a Global World

Lakshmi Gopal Vol. 39 Managing Online Content Editor Trends in electoral politics in nations across the world have given political expression to a rhetoric of nationalism that presents itself as a “turn away” from international cooperation.[1] As the global community experiences the resurgence of nationalist and xenophobic rhetoric, public discourse on the future of international […]

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Water, Water, Everywhere, and Not a Drop to Drink: Transboundary Freshwater Management and Climate Change

Stephanie Zable Vol. 39 Articles Editor Mexico City is sinking.[1] So concludes a New York Times article detailing the implications of climate change for Mexico City. But the article also notes the most severe and immediate consequence of climate change for cities all over the world: the effect on fresh water resources. In many places, […]

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Trump’s Withdrawal from the Trans-Pacific Partnership: Domestic Boost or Disaster?

Jenny Elkin Vol.  38 Associate Editor Upon election to the highest office in the United States, President Donald Trump launched a spree of executive orders. One of these orders was the swift abandonment of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade deal that his predecessor, Barack Obama, had worked for years to implement.[1] The TPP was […]

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