Aggression, from Cyber-Attacks to ISIS: Why International Law Struggles to Adapt

Albi Kocibelli Vol. 39 Editor In Chief Ius ad bellum and the notion of aggression have been a ‘yin yang’ for centuries.[1] Nevertheless, international law did not prohibit states from engaging in aggression until the conclusion of the Kellogg-Briand Pact.[2] Even then, the term was not defined.  In the aftermath of World War II, the […]

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From Compulsion to Cooperation: The Importance of the Local in a Global World

Lakshmi Gopal Vol. 39 Managing Online Content Editor Trends in electoral politics in nations across the world have given political expression to a rhetoric of nationalism that presents itself as a “turn away” from international cooperation.[1] As the global community experiences the resurgence of nationalist and xenophobic rhetoric, public discourse on the future of international […]

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“Asylum-Free Zones”: U.S. Violations of International Legal Obligations to Asylum-Seekers

Ava Morgenstern Vol. 38 Associate Editor   Certain U.S. Immigration Court jurisdictions, by almost never granting asylum, arguably violate international law obligations on fair hearings for asylum-seekers.  The problem of highly restricted access to asylum will worsen under the Trump administration.  Despite possible small measures to alleviate the situation, not much will change unless and […]

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Defeating White Jurisprudence: Towards a New Era of International Law

Lakshmi Gopal Vol. 38 Associate Editor Can white extremists be challenged, without challenging the role of white ideology in international law?[1] As white nationalism achieves international visibility once more, this is a crucial question for all those interested in using international law to a craft a world that transcends, at the very least, race, gender, […]

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